International Journal of Science, Technology and Society

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Determinants of the Use of Family Planning Methods in Ethiopia Using a Multilevel Approach

Received: 21 December 2023    Accepted: 4 January 2024    Published: 18 January 2024
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Abstract

Family planning is the most effective method to control the continuing growth of the population. Ethiopia is currently one of the fastest growing countries in the world, with a growth rate of 3.02% per year. In the next forty to fifty years, Ethiopia is predicted to account for a significant portion of the population growth expected throughout Africa. According to Ethiopia Mini Demographic and Health Survey (EMDHS) 2019, the intended use of family planning is only 36% in the country. Therefore, this study aimed to assessing the socio-demographic determinants of use of family planning among the community and regions in Ethiopia. A total of five thousand four hundred forty-three women in the age group 15 to 49 years were considered in the final data analysis. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test of independency and multilevel random coefficient model were used in the study. Sixty-four percent of the eligible women who were included in the study did not use family planning. The outcome also shows that regional and community differences accounted for almost 20% (18.6) and 22.2% (14.1) of the variation in family planning use, respectively. Women’s preceding birth interval, residence (rural/urban), their educational level, number of living children, wealth status, educational level of their husbands, currently wanted pregnancy, sex of household head, their employment status, regions and exposure to mass media have been identified as an important determinant of intended use of family planning among women of Ethiopia. To address identified concerns and assure improved levels of family planning use, decisive action is needed. This action may include educational intervention, ongoing monitoring and evaluation of family planning services, and scheduling training for providers. This information is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. This research is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. To ensure the success of the national family planning initiatives, the government and relevant organizations must put plans into place that target these effects.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14
Published in International Journal of Science, Technology and Society (Volume 12, Issue 1, February 2024)
Page(s) 35-43
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Family Planning Methods, Multilevel Analysis, EMDHS, 2019

References
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[2] M. Alemayehu et al., “Family planning use and associated factors among pastoralist community of afar region, eastern Ethiopia,” BMC Womens. Health, vol. 16, pp. 1–9, 2016.
[3] T. Mulatu, Y. Sintayehu, Y. Dessie, and M. Deressa, “Modern Family Planning Utilization and Its Associated Factors among Currently Married Women in Rural Eastern Ethiopia: A Community-Based Study,” Biomed Res. Int., vol. 2020, 2020, doi: 10.1155/2020/6096280.
[4] EMDHS, Ethiopia Mini Demographic and Health Survey 2019: Final Report. 2019. [Online]. Available: https://dhsprogram.com/pubs/pdf/FR363/FR363.pdf
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[8] J. J. Frost, L. B. Finer, and A. Tapales, “The impact of publicly funded family planning clinic services on unintended pregnancies and government cost savings,” J. Health Care Poor Underserved, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 778–796, 2008.
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[16] A. Shumye, W. Girma, and A. R. Muralidharan, “A STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF FAMILY PLANNING PRACTICES IN ETHIOPIA: AN APPLICATION OF MULTINOMIAL REGRESSION,” Eur. J. Mol. Clin. Med., vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1458–1475, 2020.
[17] E. Ngome and C. Odimegwu, “The social context of adolescent women’s use of modern contraceptives in Zimbabwe: a multilevel analysis,” Reprod. Health, vol. 11, no. 1, pp. 1–14, 2014.
[18] M. Kassim and F. Ndumbaro, “Factors affecting family planning literacy among women of childbearing age in the rural Lake zone, Tanzania,” BMC Public Health, vol. 22, no. 1, p. 646, 2022.
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[23] I. Mosha, R. Ruben, and D. Kakoko, “Family planning decisions, perceptions and gender dynamics among couples in Mwanza, Tanzania: A qualitative study,” BMC Public Health, vol. 13, no. 1, 2013, doi: 10.1186/1471-2458-13-523.
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  • APA Style

    Gagabo, S. Y., Kuse, K. A. (2024). Determinants of the Use of Family Planning Methods in Ethiopia Using a Multilevel Approach. International Journal of Science, Technology and Society, 12(1), 35-43. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14

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    ACS Style

    Gagabo, S. Y.; Kuse, K. A. Determinants of the Use of Family Planning Methods in Ethiopia Using a Multilevel Approach. Int. J. Sci. Technol. Soc. 2024, 12(1), 35-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14

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    AMA Style

    Gagabo SY, Kuse KA. Determinants of the Use of Family Planning Methods in Ethiopia Using a Multilevel Approach. Int J Sci Technol Soc. 2024;12(1):35-43. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14,
      author = {Sisay Yohannes Gagabo and Kenenisa Abdisa Kuse},
      title = {Determinants of the Use of Family Planning Methods in Ethiopia Using a Multilevel Approach},
      journal = {International Journal of Science, Technology and Society},
      volume = {12},
      number = {1},
      pages = {35-43},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijsts.20241201.14},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijsts.20241201.14},
      abstract = {Family planning is the most effective method to control the continuing growth of the population. Ethiopia is currently one of the fastest growing countries in the world, with a growth rate of 3.02% per year. In the next forty to fifty years, Ethiopia is predicted to account for a significant portion of the population growth expected throughout Africa. According to Ethiopia Mini Demographic and Health Survey (EMDHS) 2019, the intended use of family planning is only 36% in the country. Therefore, this study aimed to assessing the socio-demographic determinants of use of family planning among the community and regions in Ethiopia. A total of five thousand four hundred forty-three women in the age group 15 to 49 years were considered in the final data analysis. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test of independency and multilevel random coefficient model were used in the study. Sixty-four percent of the eligible women who were included in the study did not use family planning. The outcome also shows that regional and community differences accounted for almost 20% (18.6) and 22.2% (14.1) of the variation in family planning use, respectively. Women’s preceding birth interval, residence (rural/urban), their educational level, number of living children, wealth status, educational level of their husbands, currently wanted pregnancy, sex of household head, their employment status, regions and exposure to mass media have been identified as an important determinant of intended use of family planning among women of Ethiopia. To address identified concerns and assure improved levels of family planning use, decisive action is needed. This action may include educational intervention, ongoing monitoring and evaluation of family planning services, and scheduling training for providers. This information is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. This research is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. To ensure the success of the national family planning initiatives, the government and relevant organizations must put plans into place that target these effects.
    },
     year = {2024}
    }
    

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    AU  - Sisay Yohannes Gagabo
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    AB  - Family planning is the most effective method to control the continuing growth of the population. Ethiopia is currently one of the fastest growing countries in the world, with a growth rate of 3.02% per year. In the next forty to fifty years, Ethiopia is predicted to account for a significant portion of the population growth expected throughout Africa. According to Ethiopia Mini Demographic and Health Survey (EMDHS) 2019, the intended use of family planning is only 36% in the country. Therefore, this study aimed to assessing the socio-demographic determinants of use of family planning among the community and regions in Ethiopia. A total of five thousand four hundred forty-three women in the age group 15 to 49 years were considered in the final data analysis. Descriptive statistics, chi-square test of independency and multilevel random coefficient model were used in the study. Sixty-four percent of the eligible women who were included in the study did not use family planning. The outcome also shows that regional and community differences accounted for almost 20% (18.6) and 22.2% (14.1) of the variation in family planning use, respectively. Women’s preceding birth interval, residence (rural/urban), their educational level, number of living children, wealth status, educational level of their husbands, currently wanted pregnancy, sex of household head, their employment status, regions and exposure to mass media have been identified as an important determinant of intended use of family planning among women of Ethiopia. To address identified concerns and assure improved levels of family planning use, decisive action is needed. This action may include educational intervention, ongoing monitoring and evaluation of family planning services, and scheduling training for providers. This information is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. This research is crucial for developing strategic policies and raising the standard of family planning services. To ensure the success of the national family planning initiatives, the government and relevant organizations must put plans into place that target these effects.
    
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Author Information
  • Department of Statistics, Bonga University, Bonga, Ethiopia

  • Department of Statistics, Bule Hora University, Bule Hora, Ethiopia

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